Blog: Blogs

Reviewing Apps and Services with a security and privacy lens

Encryption is not enough. Relationship maps (identity derived from who you're associated with). Signal, Telegram, WhatsApp uses your phone number for this association. They also have access to your contact list. Protonmail and Tutanota use your email for this.

WhatsApp uses device fingerprint, so its the same to parent company FB if user is using WhatsApp, Messenger, or FB, or is using whatever login name. It's obvious to them because the device is the same. Also crowd-verified by family all in same location, and who tag people, intersecting locations. WhatsApp may be e2e encrypted.

Signal Has phone number and contact list, so not as much info as WhatsApp perhaps.

Telegram Like Signal.

Protonmail Lots of metadata available. Non-encrypted mail can be read, from insurance agents, schools, utilities, etc. Some people publicize their email address. Interdomain email. (Security people suggest using a protonmail account for only intra-domain [specific purpose] conversation, not for everything, although data-contamination happens from what your contacts are doing).

Tutanota Another email like Protonmail.


Suggestions by security people: Use something like Signal, but only with family (no concern over establishing a relationship map). Have a private email server and use in a limited way, for intradomain conversations. Use 'noIdentity.'

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PineTime Watch

Suggestions:

  • Dictionary, which works with text imput (somehow) or with voice. Does not require internet connection to work
  • Translator, same

These are two things a watch would be better suited for than a phone or other device. You have a watch handy while you're reading books, when you're on the street (some streets you might not want to take your phone out if there are thieves there), during lectures

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PinePhones

Suggestions for improvement, hardware:

  • Two microSD card slots. Since users often run their OS with one, how are they to move documents to their PinePhone. Currently, they would have to take their OS microSD out, plug it into a computer, and put the files on, or transfer over internet. Better solution is a second microSD, so they can add to their mp3s, pdfs, etc.

Suggestions for improvement, software:

  • shortcut for screen resolution. Currently, if you want to switch to 100% from the 200% resolution best for apps designed for the phone screen, you have to go through Settings etc. But this is a task you want to just click a button. A toggle could be added to the top of screen menu. Ideally, you should be able to make shortcuts in the top slidedown screen for anything you want (more or less)
  • Processing indicator animation icon. On PinePhone, sometime things seem to be taking a long time, and you don't know if the machine or process is frozen. Even on Terminal. It would be better to have some kind of indicator to show things were still happening and it's not frozen.
  • Image viewer should hold the 'left' and 'right' icons for longer. It currently displays them for like 2 seconds before they disappear, and you have to click twice to scroll to next image. It should hold for 15 or 30 seconds, and/or should be an option users can set. Also currently to swipe to next image, you have to place your finger basically off the screen and swipe. You should be able to place your finder on the left 5 or 10% of the screen and swipe.

PINEPHONE - INSTALLING AN OS

https://wiki.mobian-project.org/doku.php?id=install-linux (this also shows how to check the .img is authentic)

Method1 (boot from microUSB): use a microSD and put an OS on it and boot from it on your PinePhone (PinePhones boot from microSDs inserted in them before they boot from the internal (eMMC) memory, so anytime there's a microSD in them they'll try to boot from that first.

Method2 (install on phone): use a microSD and put the 'jumpdrive' on it, which allows you to then plug in your PinePhone to your computer with a USB and treat the PinePhone internale (eMMC) memory as a drive (then you write an OS onto that drive).

Method2 directions:

If you make a folder in your Downloads folder and name it PinePhoneStuff (you can do it otherwise, but this will make it easier to follow the code below). When you enter lsblk you can see by the size of the 'drives' that sda is my PinePhone and sdb is the sd card inside my PinePhone right now (an 8gb microSD). Therefore, I'm going to target sda when I do the dd command below (to write the .img file to the drive.

Download the jumpdrive from the internet onto your computer (mine looks like mobian-installer-pinephone-phosh-20210516.img) and then unzip it into a folder on your computer (I used a folder inside Downloads called PinePhoneStuff, as you can see in the code below). Put your microSD into your computer, delete any partitions and content on it (using Disks), and use Disk Writer to write the mobian-installer-pinephone-phosh-20210516.img to the microSD (right click on mobian-installer-pinephone-phosh-20210516.img then select Disk Writer (program), then (BE CAREFUL YOU CAN DESTROY YOUR COMPUTER HERE IF YOU SELECT YOUR COMPUTER'S HARDDRIVE) select the microSD from the dropdown be looking at the size). It will take seconds to write because it's small. Now put the microSD into your PinePhone and start your PinePhone. You will see 'Jumpdrive is running' if everything is working so far.

Now you can plug your PinePhone into your computer with a USB. Open Gparted and select your PinePhone from the dropdown (select by size again BE CAREFUL YOU CAN DESTROY YOUR COMPUTER IF YOU SELECT THE WRONG ONE). You'll probably see 2 partitions now. Delete them each (you might have to unlock them first, which probably means just going to your folder view and right-click unmount them). Once deleted, you can proceed (because you have nothing on your PinePhone's internal (eMMC) memory now. So open Terminal and type lsblk. (Notice that I put 'computername' and 'username' but yours will say something specific to your computer.) ANOTHER TIME it showed a Fat32 partition which had no 'delete' option (greyed out), but I just wrote to it anyway with Disk Image Writer.

computername:~$ lsblkEdit page

NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 1 14.5G 0 disk
sdb 8:16 1 7.5G 0 disk
└─sdb1 8:17 1 49M 0 part /media/username/SDNAME nvme0n1 259:0 0 238.5G 0 disk
├─nvme0n1p1 259:1 0 512M 0 part /boot/efi ├─nvme0n1p2 259:2 0 732M 0 part /boot └─nvme0n1p3 259:3 0 237.3G 0 part
└─sda3_crypt 253:0 0 237.2G 0 crypt ├─vgubuntu--studio-root │ 253:1 0 236.3G 0 lvm / └─vgubuntu--studio-swap_1 253:2 0 976M 0 lvm [SWAP]

username@computername:~$ sudo dd bs=64k if=~/Downloads/PinePhoneStuff/mobian-installer-pinephone-phosh-20210516.img of=/dev/sda status=progress (note that it might be sda, sdb, sdc, depending where your phone is mounted. Run lsblk without the phone plugged in, look at the sizes of the media, then plug in and do the same. Don't forget that your microSD that you have in your phone for JumpDrive will be found as yet another drive by lsblk.)

[sudo] password for username:

(wait a while, maybe 5 minutes ... then see:)

7997816832 bytes (8.0 GB, 7.4 GiB) copied, 404 s, 19.8 MB/s 122070+1 records in 122070+1 records out 8000000000 bytes (8.0 GB, 7.5 GiB) copied, 619.432 s, 12.9 MB/s

Then it'll return to the ready to accept a command state (Terminal will, I mean). Unplug your phone, remove the microSD, reboot the phone (by holding down the power button for several seconds each way). It should now bot into a Mobian screen (it might show a screen asking for a password, but just wait a bit and I think it'll just bypass that). You can select you install options. Then it will 'unpack' which takes about 15 or 20 minutes I think.


AFTER INSTALLATION of OS

Blinking blue light? Known issue. Turn it off:

echo '0' > /sys/class/leds/blue:indicator/brightness

(replace 0 with 1 to turn it on)

Install:

  • nautilus
  • musescore or musescore3
  • musescore3: sid (unstable), bullseye (testing/Debian 11), buster-backports (stable/Debian 10), stretch-backports-sloppy (oldstable/Debian 9)
  • musescore: buster (stable/Debian 10), stretch-backports (oldstable/Debian 9), jessie-backports-sloppy (oldoldstable/Debian 8)
  • mpv
  • ddgr (duckduckgobrowser)
  • falkon browser (for direct connection)
  • firefox (torified browser with settings set to minimize stuff)
  • wipri mac address-anonymizer
  • firejail sandboxing (easy to use configurator)
  • inkscape
  • lmms
  • featherpad
  • Kden
  • Thunar
  • GNU
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Studies in Comparative Law

Books (from https://www.nyulawglobal.org/globalex/Comparative_Law1.html )

  • The main classic European theoretical works on comparative law are: David, R., Jauffret-Spinosi, C., and Gore, M., Les grands systèmes de droit contemporains, 12e éd. Paris, Dalloz, 2016. The book has been translated into numerous languages. An English version of the 6th edition of 1974 was published by Sweet and Maxwell as Major legal systems in the world today, 3rd edition in 1985 (out of print).
  • Zweigert, K. and Kötz, H., Einführung in die Rechtsvergleichung, 3e Aufl. Tübingen, Mohr, 1996. English translation: Introduction to comparative law, translated from the German by Tony Weir. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • Breda, V., ed. Legal transplants in East Asia and Oceania,Cambridge University Press, 2019.
  • De Cruz, P. Comparative law in a changing world, 3rd. Routledge-Cavendish, 2007.
  • Glendon, M., et al, Comparative legal traditions: text, materials, and cases on western law, 4th ed. West Academic, 2015.
  • Glenn, H P. Legal traditions of the world: sustainable diversity in law, 5th ed. Oxford University Press, 2014 (1st edition gained the Canada Prize, International Academy of Comparative Law, 1998).
  • Harding, A. and Örücü, E. (eds.) Comparative law in the 21st Century. Kluwer Law International, 2002.
  • Legrand, P. and Munday, R. (eds.) Comparative legal studies: traditions and transitions. Cambridge University Press, 2003.
  • (Want to read) Menski, W., Comparative law in a global context: the legal systems of Asia and Africa, 2nd ed. Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  • Merryman, J.H. and Pérez-Perdomo, R. The civil law tradition: an introduction to the legal systems of Europe and Latin America, 4th ed. Stanford University Press, 2018.
  • Palmer, V., ed., Mixed jurisdictions worldwide: the third legal family. 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, 2012.
  • Riles, A. Rethinking the masters of comparative law. Hart Publishing, 2001.
  • Varga, C. European legal cultures.Dartmouth Publishing, 1997.
  • Zimmermann, R. Mixed legal systems in comparative perspective: property and obligations in Scotland and South Africa. Oxford University Press, 2003.
  • Zimmermann, R. and Reimann, M. The Oxford handbook of comparative law, 2nd ed.,Oxford University Press, 2019.
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The Deneuve letter from 2018, translated into English

Rape is a crime. But insistent or awkward flirting is not a crime, nor is chivalry a macho aggression.

In the wake of the Weinstein affair, there has been a legitimate awareness of sexual violence against women, particularly in the professional context, where some men abuse their power. It was necessary. But this liberation of the word is now turning into its opposite: we are told to speak as we should, to keep quiet about what makes us angry, and those who refuse to comply with such injunctions are seen as traitors, as accomplices!

But it is the very essence of puritanism to borrow, in the name of a supposed general good, the arguments of the protection of women and their emancipation to better chain them to a status of eternal victims, poor little things under the influence of phallocrats, as in the good old days of witchcraft.

Denunciations and indictments

In fact, #metoo has led to a campaign of denunciations and public indictments in the press and on social networks of individuals who, without being given the opportunity neither to answer nor to defend themselves, have been put on exactly the same level as sexual abusers. This expeditious justice has already had its victims, men sanctioned in the exercise of their profession, forced to resign, etc., when their only fault was to have touched a knee, tried to steal a kiss, talked about "intimate" things at a professional dinner or to have sent messages with sexual connotations to a woman for whom the attraction was not mutual.

This fever to send "pigs" to the slaughterhouse, far from helping women to empower themselves, actually serves the interests of the enemies of sexual freedom, religious extremists, the worst reactionaries and those who believe, in the name of a substantial conception of the good and the Victorian morality that goes with it, that women are beings "apart", children with an adult face, demanding to be protected.

On the other hand, the men are summoned to beat their chests and find, in the depths of their retrospective conscience, an "inappropriate behavior" that they might have had ten, twenty or thirty years ago, and for which they should repent. The public confession, the incursion of self-appointed prosecutors into the private sphere, creates a climate of totalitarian society.

The purifying wave seems to know no limits. Here, a nude by Egon Schiele is censored on a poster; here, a painting by Balthus is called for removal from a museum on the grounds that it would be an apology for pedophilia; in the confusion of man and work, a request is made to ban the Roman Polanski retrospective at the Cinémathèque and the retrospective devoted to Jean-Claude Brisseau is postponed. An academic judges the film Blow-Up, by Michelangelo Antonioni, "misogynistic" and "unacceptable". In the light of this revisionism, John Ford (The Prisoner of the Desert) and even Nicolas Poussin (The Rape of the Sabine Women) are not doing well.

Already, publishers are asking some of us to make our male characters less "sexist", to talk about sexuality and love with less excessiveness, or to make the "traumas suffered by the female characters" more obvious! On the verge of ridicule, a bill in Sweden wants to impose explicitly notified consent to any candidate for sexual intercourse! One more effort and two adults who want to sleep together will have to check a document on their phone in which the practices they accept and those they refuse will be duly listed.

Indispensable freedom to offend

The philosopher Ruwen Ogien defended a freedom to offend that is essential to artistic creation.

In the same way, we defend a freedom to annoy, essential to sexual freedom. We are today sufficiently informed to admit that the sexual impulse is by nature offensive and wild, but we are also sufficiently clear-sighted not to confuse awkward flirting with sexual aggression.

Above all, we are aware that the human person is not monolithic: a woman can, in the same day, lead a professional team and enjoy being the sexual object of a man, without being a "slut" or a vile accomplice of patriarchy. She can ensure that her salary is equal to that of a man, but not feel forever traumatized by a rubbing in the subway, even if it is considered a crime. She may even see it as an expression of great sexual misery, or even as a non-event.

As women, we do not recognize ourselves in this feminism which, beyond the denunciation of the abuse of power, takes the face of a hatred of men and sexuality. We think that the freedom to say no to a sexual proposal does not go without the freedom to importune.

And we consider that it is necessary to know how to answer to this freedom to importune differently than by locking oneself in the role of the prey.

For those of us who have chosen to have children, we feel it is best to raise our daughters to be informed and aware enough to live their lives fully without being intimidated or made to feel guilty.

The accidents that can happen to a woman's body do not necessarily affect her dignity and should not, no matter how hard they may be, necessarily make her a perpetual victim. For we are not reducible to our bodies. Our inner freedom is inviolable. And this freedom that we cherish is not without risks and responsibilities.

The editors of this text are : Sarah Chiche (writer, clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst), Catherine Millet (art critic, writer), Catherine Robbe-Grillet (actress and writer), Peggy Sastre (author, journalist and translator), Abnousse Shalmani (writer and journalist).

Other members of this forum are: Kathy Alliou (curator), Marie-Laure Bernadac (honorary general curator), Stéphanie Blake (author of children's books), Ingrid Caven (actress and singer), Catherine Deneuve (actress), Gloria Friedmann (visual artist), Cécile Guilbert (writer), Brigitte Jaques-Wajeman (director), Claudine Junien (geneticist), Brigitte Lahaie (actress and radio presenter), Elisabeth Lévy Elisabeth Lévy (editor of Causeur), Joëlle Losfeld (publisher), Sophie de Menthon (president of the ETHIC movement), Marie Sellier (author, president of the Société des gens de lettres).n the same way, we defend a freedom to annoy, essential to sexual freedom. We are today sufficiently informed to admit that the sexual impulse is by nature offensive and wild, but we are also sufficiently clear-sighted not to confuse awkward flirting with sexual aggression.

Above all, we are aware that the human person is not monolithic: a woman can, in the same day, lead a professional team and enjoy being the sexual object of a man, without being a "slut" or a vile accomplice of patriarchy. She can ensure that her salary is equal to that of a man, but not feel forever traumatized by a rubbing in the subway, even if it is considered a crime. She may even see it as an expression of great sexual misery, or even as a non-event.

As women, we do not recognize ourselves in this feminism which, beyond the denunciation of the abuse of power, takes the face of a hatred of men and sexuality. We think that the freedom to say no to a sexual proposal does not go without the freedom to importune.

And we consider that it is necessary to know how to answer to this freedom to importune differently than by locking oneself in the role of the prey.

For those of us who have chosen to have children, we feel it is best to raise our daughters to be informed and aware enough to live their lives fully without being intimidated or made to feel guilty.

The accidents that can happen to a woman's body do not necessarily affect her dignity and should not, no matter how hard they may be, necessarily make her a perpetual victim. For we are not reducible to our bodies. Our inner freedom is inviolable. And this freedom that we cherish is not without risks and responsibilities.

The editors of this text are : Sarah Chiche (writer, clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst), Catherine Millet (art critic, writer), Catherine Robbe-Grillet (actress and writer), Peggy Sastre (author, journalist and translator), Abnousse Shalmani (writer and journalist).

Other members of this forum are: Kathy Alliou (curator), Marie-Laure Bernadac (honorary general curator), Stéphanie Blake (author of children's books), Ingrid Caven (actress and singer), Catherine Deneuve (actress), Gloria Friedmann (visual artist), Cécile Guilbert (writer), Brigitte Jaques-Wajeman (director), Claudine Junien (geneticist), Brigitte Lahaie (actress and radio presenter), Elisabeth Lévy Elisabeth Lévy (editor of Causeur), Joëlle Losfeld (publisher), Sophie de Menthon (president of the ETHIC movement), Marie Sellier (author, president of the Société des gens de lettres).

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